Finished Reading: Sorcery of Thorns

What It’s About: All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer’s Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather.

Then an act of sabotage releases the library’s most dangerous grimoire, and Elisabeth is implicated in the crime. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.

As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she’s been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined.



This book. When I finished it, I wished I could read it again right away because I had so much fun. I also flew through this book and hated putting it down each night for sleep. A book series can be so draining so when you find a standalone fantasy novel and it is good, you breathe a sigh of relief for more than one reason.

The lore of the libraries and the books themselves having their own personalities and souls, was so creepy and lovely. Elisabeth wanting to become a warden and take up a sword to protect the books and keep them in line was so much fun. The magic system in this world is fascinating and dark.

I really enjoyed the characters: Nathanial, Elisabeth, Katrien, and Silas. Silas, especially, he was so interesting and at times quietly horrifying. I would read an entire book dedicated to just him and his history. This is definitely a book where the characters all shine and you want to know more and more about them.

The romance is slow-burn and full of yearning, which I really enjoyed. I also just liked Nathanial and Elisabeth getting to know each other and fighting to save the world together. They were so much fun and I did enjoy Nathanial’s jokes.

While the villain is a bit basic and unremarkable (spoiler: a lot of villains are), their whole plan taking decades and being about legacy was pretty incredible. This story of evil also just highlights the absolute awfulness, arrogance, and ignorance of those people with power.

I believe the only real thing that lacked for me when it came to this book was how the final battle was handled. It felt like the final battle just ended and was resolved, and I wanted it described a bit more. To really see its last moments unfold on the page. That would have made the book longer, but I wouldn’t have minded.

I feel like this is a new favourite book for me, which is exciting. I’m also looking forward to the novella for this book coming out in January 2023.



Waiting on Wednesday

“Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly meme that first originated at Breaking the Spine but has since linked up with “Can’t Wait Wednesday” at Wishful Endings. It’s a great chance to share the upcoming books that we’re excited to read. I’m happy to participate!


When I heard abut this novel, I added it to my list of things to check out in 2022. It just sounded so damn cool and I love how it is a historical fiction novel too.

Title: A Million to One
Written by: Adiba Jaigirdar

What It’s About: Josefa is an unapologetic and charismatic thief, who loves the thrill of the chase. She has her eye on her biggest mark yet—the RMS Titanic, the most luxurious ship in the world. But she isn’t interested in stealing from wealthy first-class passengers onboard. No, she’s out for the ultimate prize: the Rubiyat, a one of a kind book encrusted with gems that’s worth millions.

Josefa can’t score it alone, so she enlists a team of girls with unique talents: Hinnah, a daring acrobat and contortionist; Violet, an actress and expert dissembler; and Emilie, an artist who can replicate any drawing by hand.

They couldn’t be more different and yet they have one very important thing in common: their lives depend on breaking into the vault and capturing the Rubiyat. But careless mistakes, old grudges, and new romance threaten to jeopardize everything they’ve worked for and put them in incredible danger when tragedy strikes.

While the odds of pulling off the heist are slim, the odds of survival are even slimmer…

Book Addiction Book Tag

I found this book tag over on Becky’s Book Blog (check them out!), but sadly I wasn’t successful in tracking down the original creator of the tag. If anyone comes across this post and knows who they are, please let me know so I can update this with their name and a link to their blog.

I like participating in tags quite a bit so it is always exciting to find one you really want to work on for your blog. Let’s do this!


What is the longest amount of time you can comfortably go without picking up a book?

I can go about 2 days to a week without picking up a book. If I’m in a reading slump or preoccupied with something stressful, I will probably go longer.


How many books do you carry on your person (or kindle) at any one time?

I can comfortably carry one physical book around with me. If I have my canvas book bag, I can carry about three books. Do not even look at me as I come out of the library, my book bag will be bursting at the seams with books.


Do you keep every book you buy/receive or are you happy to pass them on to make space for more?

I don’t! You have to let things go eventually whether it is because you want to declutter or move or make room for other books. I recently donated a box of 15 books I knew I would not read again, and I hope they go out into the world and make someone happy.


How long would you spend in a bookshop on a standard visit?

I am notorious for going into a bookshop and saying I’ll be there for 20 minutes, and then coming out 45 minutes later. I cannot be tamed in a bookstore when it comes to time. I just like to look, consider, and walk around.


How much time per day do you actually spend reading?

It’s about 2-3 hours. Most nights, I read to relax before I turn out the lights to sleep. It helps my mind let go of the day.


Where does the task ‘picking up a book’ appear on your daily to-do list?

It’s probably the last task of the day since I read before I go to sleep.


How many books do you reckon you own in total (including e-books)?

I honestly do not know since I’ve never counted them and am so so lucky to even own them. But my shelves definitely show parts of me throughout time. Some of the books are from my childhood, which my mom bought to encourage me to read at my own pace. Some are from my teens, when I became obsessed with Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and Anne Rice. And some are more recent to show how deep I have dived into reading fantasy stories.


Approximately how often do you bring up books in conversation?

Not often. I don’t really have people to discuss books with. The blog is where I do the most talking about book with the community here.


What is the biggest book (page count) you have finished reading?

It has to be House of Earth and Blood by Sarah J. Maas, which is 816 pages long in paperback.


Is there a book you had to get your hands on against all odds (i.e searching bookshops, online digging, etc.)?

I’ve been pretty lucky. Most of the books I’ve wanted to read have either been at the library or it’s been in print and easy to find in-store or at a used bookstore. However, I do lament some of the special editions I have seen that come as part of book boxes or are specific to a bookstore in another country.


A book you struggled to finish but refused to DNF?

It had to be Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell. I was just so bored with it that I put it down for months and didn’t pick it up to finish it until recently. I was determined! But it was a struggle!


What are 3 of your main book goals for 2022?

Hmmmm. 1. Read a lot. 2. Enjoy what I read. 3. Discover a new favorite author.


Have you ever had the privilege of converting someone into a reader (maybe via inspiration or incessant nagging)?

I once tried, however, my friend did not listen to me. My reading suggestions were ignored! I also tried to describe a book to a coworker and they thought the book I was reading was ridiculous, and so I never ever suggested a book to them ever again.


Describe what books mean to you in five words.

Happiness. Magic. Imagination. Knowledge. Empathy.

First Lines Friday: September 23, 2022

Hello and bonjour! Bonjour and hello!

It’s another Friday and I’ve got another book to highlight.


If you didn’t already know…First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?


“The boy clung tightly to his sister’s hand when they fled the palace, afraid that if he let go he might lose her forever. Their home was no longer safe—not with their father dead and the stench of betrayal in the air.”


This book came out in 2021 and while every reviewer I trusted either forgot it existed or didn’t enjoy it a whole lot, I still think about this book a lot and want to read it at some point.


Title: Jade Fire Gold
Written by: June C.L. Tan

What It’s About: In an empire on the brink of war . . .

Ahn is no one, with no past and no family.

Altan is a lost heir, his future stolen away as a child.

When they meet, Altan sees in Ahn a path to reclaiming the throne. Ahn sees a way to finally unlock her past and understand her lethal magical abilities.

But they may have to pay a far deadlier price than either could have imagined.


Be well, readers.

Currently Reading: Sorcery of Thorns

What It’s About: All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer’s Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather.

Then an act of sabotage releases the library’s most dangerous grimoire, and Elisabeth is implicated in the crime. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.

As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she’s been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined.



This book has everything I could ever want – swords, sorcery, and libraries.

I’ve been so in the mood for a fantasy adventure lately that I decided to finally pick up this book. I’d never read a book by Margaret Rogerson, but I’ve always been interested in this particular book of hers.

I’m having a really great time reading it so far and just don’t want to put it down. But alas, life.

Finished Reading: A Court of Thorns and Roses Series Books 2-3

What It’s About: When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a terrifying creature arrives to demand retribution. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she knows about only from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not truly a beast, but one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled her world.

At least, he’s not a beast all the time.

As she adapts to her new home, her feelings for the faerie, Tamlin, transform from icy hostility into a fiery passion that burns through every lie she’s been told about the beautiful, dangerous world of the Fae. But something is not right in the faerie lands. An ancient, wicked shadow is growing, and Feyre must find a way to stop it, or doom Tamlin—and his world—forever.



Remember how I said I would never return to this series? I played myself because my curiosity always gets the better of me in the end. I just had to know what happened next in book 2…and then in book 3. Buckle in, folks, you’re in for a long and rambling post.

A Court of Mist and Fury (Book 2)

Despite the second book being real long (maybe more than it should have probably been), it was easier to get through than the first book in some ways. In this book, we get to see more of the world like the Night and Summer Courts. I didn’t realize while reading the first book just how small the world felt and that it was much larger. I like that we were introduced to more characters here like Mor, Amren, and Azriel. I just wish those friendships felt more established and built up rather than instant. I love found family stories, but I honestly doubt how deep the friendship between Mor and Feyre really went.

The King of Hybern was mildly interesting and would have been more interesting had he been much more than a basic villain with zero personality besides being evil and down to clown (i.e. start a war/destroy the world). It’s just so strange that for a villain…we know very little about him besides that he’s causing these characters some major anxiety.

I had never liked Tamlin. I honestly think there were a lot of bad things about the Spring Court and the way of life there from the beginning. While Tamlin wasn’t my choice or even the best choice, I do feel like Feyre sure switched teams really fast considering her love for Tamilin was one she would have died for. But then again, they did fall in love and profess those feelings in desperation and haste in that first novel. So really, was it ever going to be a strong relationship when it was built on very little?

I’m going to say it now, steamy scenes were not and are not for me. Not written by anyone, but especially not by this author. They were just so unnecessary and gratuitous, and I’m not sure who exactly they were written for. I’m more of an admirer of romance in fantasy books rather than smut. And the concept of mates, I wish it would stop being included in fiction, especially, when a lot of those mated relationships are shown to be abusive.

I have a feel like this series is more about the romance than the fantasy setting and events. There isn’t a balance there and it shows in how the fantasy world feels a bit lacking for me.



A Court of Wings and Ruin (Book 3)

I had hope for book 3 in this series. I was hoping that after the ending of book 2, we would be in the thick of things and going with a fast paced plot. I did not expect it to be mostly about building an army against Hybern and the drama between the inner circle.

I feel like the second book was already where they were trying to get people to join them and take them seriously regarding Hybern so to continue that in this book made the story drag a lot. And the thing is I knew that the first meeting with Tamlin after Feyre’s revenge would be ugly and was hoping that it really wouldn’t be gross, but sadly, it was such a gross and cliché exchange that I had to put the book down for a little while.

I did like that we got more of Nesta and Elain in this book. Nesta being her usual awful self and Elain being…something a little stranger. It really bugged me that it took so long to figure out what was wrong with Elain.

I’m also not sure why the word “male” and “males” was used so often throughout the series, but it bugged me so much by the last novel. Are we really going to try and reinforce those notions of hyper and toxic masculinity? There’s enough of that already in the fantasy genre (written by men too). There are also other descriptors one can use to describe a character and I’m not sure why those weren’t employed here. The editor of this book really should have done something about this.

The stakes had been built up to be so high for this book so when nothing happens for most of it and a lot of the action happens towards the end, it was a bit of a let down. It didn’t feel like a balanced story.

This book proved to me that this series is truly more about the romance. The fantasy world and elements are secondary. Very much so and that’s what is so disappointing. I mean…besides the inclusion of additional steamy scenes in this book that I wish I could banish from my mind.

The opportunity to build an epic fantasy series where a girl comes from nothing, heals from trauma, becomes more, and saves the world was squandered with this series.



Will I read Nesta’s book? Maybe. I do love to just hurt myself by reading these novels.

First Lines Friday: September 16, 2022

Bonjour and hello! Hello and bonjour!

Another Friday has come and almost gone. There’s an actual chill to the air now that I have missed.

Anyway, let’s get into it before I launch into a poem about how much I love Fall.


If you didn’t already know…First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?


“If I hadn’t come to the convent’s cemetery to be alone, I wouldn’t have noticed the silver gleam of the censer lying abandoned at the base of a tombstone. Every novice and sister carried one, a thurible on a chain to defend ourselves against the Dead, and I recognized this censer by its shape and its tracery of black tarnish as belonging to Sophia, one of the youngest novices, brought to the convent only last winter.”


An excerpt for this book is included at the back of the novel I am currently reading and I am very interested in it so I might pick it up sometime soon.


Title: Vespertine
Written by: Margaret Rogerson

What It’s About: The spirits of the dead do not rest.

Artemisia is training to be a Gray Sister, a nun who cleanses the bodies of the deceased so that their souls can pass on; otherwise, they will rise as ravenous, hungry spirits. She would rather deal with the dead than the living, who whisper about her scarred hands and troubled past.

When her convent is attacked by possessed soldiers, Artemisia defends it by awakening an ancient spirit bound to a saint’s relic. It is a revenant, a malevolent being whose extraordinary power almost consumes her—but death has come, and only a vespertine, a priestess trained to wield a high relic, has any chance of stopping it. With all knowledge of vespertines lost to time, Artemisia turns to the last remaining expert for help: the revenant itself.

As she unravels a sinister mystery of saints, secrets, and dark magic, Artemisia discovers that facing this hidden evil might require her to betray everything she believes—if the revenant doesn’t betray her first.


That’s all from me, folks. Be well.

Waiting on Wednesday

“Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly meme that first originated at Breaking the Spine but has since linked up with “Can’t Wait Wednesday” at Wishful Endings. It’s a great chance to share the upcoming books that we’re excited to read. I’m happy to participate!


I have been obsessed with this author since the first novel I read from them.

I did not know this one was coming our way so soon, but here it is! It’s coming at us on November 8, 2022.

Title: Saha
Written by: Cho Nam-Joo
Translated by: Jamie Chang

What It’s About: In a country called Town, Su is found dead in an abandoned car. The suspected killer is presumed to come from the Saha Estates.

Town is the safest and richest nation on earth, controlled by a secretive organization of seven ministers. It is a society clearly divided into the haves and have-nots, and those who have the very least live in the decrepit Saha Estates. Among them is Jin-Kyung, a young woman whose brother, Do-kyung, was in a relationship with Su and quickly becomes the police’s prime suspect. When Do-kyungdisappears, Jin-kyung is determined to get to the bottom of things. On her quest to find the truth, though, she will uncover a reality far darker and crimes far greater than she could ever have imagined.

At once a dystopian mystery and a devastating critique of how we live now, Saha lifts the lid on corruption, exploitation, and government oppression, while, with deep humanity and compassion, showing us the lives of those who suffer at the hand of brutal forces far beyond their control.

Waiting on Wednesday

“Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly meme that first originated at Breaking the Spine but has since linked up with “Can’t Wait Wednesday” at Wishful Endings. It’s a great chance to share the upcoming books that we’re excited to read. I’m happy to participate!


I did not know this series was being written.

If I had, I would have been on it from the beginning. I’ve included it in this week’s Waiting on Wednesday because it deserves to be be shared. I’m just so excited about it! It comes November 1st, 2022.

Title: Batgirls Vol. 1.
Written by: Becky Cloonen and Michael Conrad
Drawn by: Jorge Corona

What It’s About: Batgirls Cassandra Cain and Stephanie Brown are only able to navigate the dark, gritty, and oftentimes scary city of Gotham by leaning on the bright light that is their best-friendship.

Mentored by Oracle, the Batgirls move to the other side of town where Barbara Gordon can keep a better eye on them while the hacker Seer is still invading their lives. Steph may be too rash sometimes, and Cass doesn’t speak much—but what they lack in similarities, they make up for with their mutual respect and love for each other…and what makes them stronger together as Batgirls! And they may be good at kicking ass, but they are just trying their best to be normal teenagers—who’ll borrow the keys to a muscle car that belonged to a bad guy and perhaps give it a joyride around town without a driver’s license, then race to get back home to Oracle by curfew!

First Lines Friday: August 26, 2022

Hello and bonjour! Bonjour and hello!

It’s Friday! I’m looking forward to signing off from work at the end of today and just settling in with a good book. Also, just looking forward to laying down in general.

Anyway, let’s get into it.


If you didn’t already know…First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first pageCopy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader firstFinally… reveal the book!


“The first time Eliza Grey laid eyes on the baby was at dusk in a slow-moving boxcar on a rain-swept stretch of the line three miles west of Bury St Edmunds, in Suffolk, England. She was sixteen years old, unlettered, unworldly, with eyes dark as the rain, hungry because she had not eaten since the night before last, coatless and hatless because she had fled in the dark without thinking where she could run to or what she might do next.”


This book is a big one. In size. I haven’t heard much about it in terms of reviews by others, but the story sounds really good. Like it would definitely be something I enjoy. I hope I can pick it up soon to really dive into the story’s world and the writing, which really pulled me in on those first two lines.


Title: Ordinary Monsters (The Talents Trilogy #1)
Written by: J.M. Miro

What It’s About: Charlie Ovid, despite surviving a brutal childhood in Mississippi, doesn’t have a scar on him. His body heals itself, whether he wants it to or not. Marlowe, a foundling from a railway freight car, shines with a strange bluish light. He can melt or mend flesh. When Alice Quicke, a jaded detective with her own troubled past, is recruited to escort them to safety, all three begin a journey into the nature of difference and belonging, and the shadowy edges of the monstrous.

What follows is a story of wonder and betrayal, from the gaslit streets of London, and the wooden theaters of Meiji-era Tokyo, to an eerie estate outside Edinburgh where other children with gifts—like Komako, a witch-child and twister of dust, and Ribs, a girl who cloaks herself in invisibility—are forced to combat the forces that threaten their safety. There, the world of the dead and the world of the living threaten to collide. With this new found family, Komako, Marlowe, Charlie, Ribs, and the rest of the Talents discover the truth about their abilities. And as secrets within the Institute unfurl, a new question arises: What truly defines a monster?


Better get back to work. So be well, readers.